Tag Archives: comedy

The Illusionist (2010)

The Illusionist (Chomet, 2010)

The previous year was an incredibly strong year for animated films the world over. Japan delivered the strongest showing with Summer Wars, Ireland brought the fantastic The Secret of Kells, and France yielded the joyous display of absurdity known as A Town Called Panic. And once again we find ourselves in France for Sylvain Chomet’s adaptation of Jaques Tati’s script for The Illusionist. While Chomet plays his comedy in a broad sense, likely a departure from Tati’s signature style, the pull of the film is located in its ability to balance strong emotional scenes with the tension of an ever changing world. Continue reading

The Green Hornet (2011)

The Green Hornet (Gondry, 2011)

I had a chance to catch an advanced 3-D screening of Michel Gondry’s latest film, The Green Hornet, last night, so I am taking a bit of a break from my 2010 coverage to venture in to the present. Never early enough to get a jump on the current year, especially when that jump involves the director of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Be Kind Rewind, and others. Not to mention a script from the men who penned Superbad, an Asian pop star taking up acting, and one of the more compelling comedians working today. So with all this talent involved this cannot possibly go wrong, right? Continue reading

Top 97 Films (Part Two)

Exactly one year ago today, well actually one year and two days ago today, I published my list of Top 97 Films at the older version of Processed Grass with the intention of revisiting the list one year later to see how things had changed. As I compiled my list this year I found quite a few surprises, some films that did not settle as well as I had originally perceived, and one major shake up that was about three years in the making. As usual, I will revisit this list next year on August the 17th and post a third updated list. But so much for the talking, let’s get to the films! Continue reading

I’ve Liked You For A Thousand Years. I Can’t Wait Until I See You.

Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (Wright, 2010)

In the past few years the Hollywood interest in comic book films has continued to crescendo with huge critical and financial successes such as the Spiderman, Iron Man, and Batman franchises. Aside from being overly saturated by testosterone, such hits have lined summers with blockbuster after blockbuster by sticking to a generic story telling structure of origin stories and world threatening conflict to provide enough action to coerce the adrenaline to come out and frolic. But top tier names are only so plentiful, so the surge in comic book popularity led to various graphic novels getting translations to the silver screen in the form of Watchmen, Sin City, and most recently Kick-Ass. These films focus heavily on action, but the visual flourishes in these films are much more prominent and distinctly separate them form the larger hyped films. So when a director whose claim to fame is his astounding ability to deftly blend genres tackles a film that asks him to combine the entertainment of high action sequences with the charm of a niche graphic novel when I reach a killscreen am I going to want to press continue? Continue reading